Kitchen Sink Trap

Kitchen Sink Trap

This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (December 2016) (Learn how and when to remove this template message) Water seal in drain pipe under a sink. Water enters at right, fills the trap, and continues left. Siphoning takes place above the line “B”, while inverted siphoning occurs below the line “A”. Examples of traps In plumbing, a trap is a device which has a shape that uses a bending path to capture water to prevent sewer gases from entering buildings. In refinery applications, traps are used to prevent hydrocarbons and other dangerous gases from escaping outside through drains. In domestic applications, traps are typically U, S, or J-shaped pipe located below or within a plumbing fixture. An S-shaped trap is also known as an S-bend. It was invented by Alexander Cummings in 1775 but became known as the U-bend following the introduction of the U-shaped trap by Thomas Crapper in 1880. The new U-bend could not jam, so, unlike the S-bend, it did not need an overflow. The most common of these traps in houses is referred to as a P-trap. It is the addition of a 90 degree fitting on the outlet side of a U-bend, thereby creating a P-like shape. It is also referred to as a sink trap because it is installed under most house sinks. Because of its shape, the trap retains a small amount of water after the fixture’s use. This water in the trap creates a seal that prevents sewer gas from passing from the drain pipes back into the occupied space of the building. Essentially all plumbing fixtures including sinks, bathtubs, and toilets must be equipped with either an internal or external trap. Because it is a localized low-point in the plumbing, sink traps also tend to capture heavy objects (such as jewelry) that are inadvertently dropped into the sink. Traps also tend to collect hair, sand, and other debris and limit the ultimate size of objects that will pass on into the rest of the plumbing, thereby catching oversized objects. For all of these reasons, most traps can either be disassembled for cleaning or they provide some sort of cleanout feature. When a large volume of water may be discharged through the trap, a standpipe may be required to prevent impact to other nearby traps. Contents 1 Venting and auxiliary devices 2 Accepted traps 3 See also 4 Notes 5 External links Venting and auxiliary devices Trap with copper drain pipe at underside of firestop packing in 2 hour fire-resistance rated concrete floor slab Typical P-trap Maintaining the water seal is critical to trap operation; traps can and do dry out, and poor venting can suction or blow water out of the traps. This is usually avoided by venting the drain pipes downstream of the trap; by being vented to the atmosphere outside the building, the drain lines never operate at a pressure much higher or lower than atmospheric pressure. Plumbing codes usually provide strict limitations on how far a trap may be located from the nearest vent stack. When a vent cannot be provided, codes may allow the use of an air admittance valve instead. These devices avoid negative pressure in the drain pipe by venting room air into the drain pipe (behind the trap). A “Chicago Loop” is another alternative. When a trap is installed on a fixture that is not routinely used, the eventual evaporation of the water in the trap must be considered. In these cases, a trap primer may be installed; these are devices that automatically recharge traps with water to maintain their water seals. Accepted traps In some regions of the United States, “S” traps are no longer accepted by the plumbing codes or are even illegal, as these traps tend to easily siphon dry even when well-vented. It is often possible to tell whether a household uses an S- or U-bend by checking for the presence of an overflow pipe outlet. What is required instead is a P-trap with proper venting. Certain drum-styled traps are also discouraged or banned. See also Buchan trap Domestic water system Drainage Garbage disposal Plumbing drainage venting Standpipe (plumbing) Sanitation Septic systems Septic tank Water pipe Notes ^ Saltzman, Reuben (April 18, 2013). “How Bad Are Drum Traps?”. The Home Inspector (blog). Star Tribune. Minneapolis. Archived from the original on July 15, 2015. Retrieved December 28, 2016. Includes several photographs of various types of drum traps. External links Wikimedia Commons has media related to Trap (plumbing). v t e Toilets Equipment Automatic toilet paper dispenser Ballcock Bidet Bidet shower Brush Cistern Electronic bidet Flushometer Roll holder Seat Seat cover Self-cleaning toilet bowl Self-cleaning toilet seat Toilet paper Trap (U-bend) Types Aircraft Accessible Arborloo Bedpan Blair Board Bucket Cathole Chemical Composting Container-based Dry Dual flush Dunny Flush Freezing Head (boat) Hudo (Scouting) Incinerating Latrine Low-flush Passenger train Pay Pit Pig Portable Public Sanisette (self-cleaning) Space Squat Treebog Unisex public Urine-diverting dry Washlet Cultural aspects Adult diaper Bathroom privileges Feminine hygiene Flying toilet Honeywagon Incontinence pad Islamic toilet etiquette Istinja Latrinalia Manual scavenging Outhouse Privatization of public toilets Rest area Scatology Shit Museum Slopping out Toilet (room) Toilet god Toilet humor Toilet paper orientation Toileting Toilet training Toilet-related injuries and deaths Toilets in Japan Toilet Twinning Urinary segregation Washroom attendant Urine-related aspects Female urination device Interactive urinal Pissoir Pollee Urination Urinal Urinal (health care) Urine collection device Urine diversion Feces-related aspects Anal cleansing Defecation Defecation postures Fecal sludge management Night soil Open defecation Historical terms Aphedron Chamber pot Close stool Commode Garderobe Gong farmer Groom of the stool Pail closet Privy midden Reredorter See also History of water supply and sanitation Menstruation Sanitation Sewage treatment World Toilet Day
kitchen sink trap 1

Kitchen Sink Trap

Step 2: Loosen the Drain Trap Unscrew the two nuts that keep the trap in place. Aaron Stickley The drain trap is the J-shaped piece of pipe the connect the tailpiece of the sink drain. Because of the sharp bend in the trap, it is by far the most common place for drain clogs to occur. You may be able to loosen the slip nuts holding the trap to the tailpiece and trap arm by hand. If the slip nuts can be moved by hand, then unscrew them completely. If the nuts can't be moved by hand, use channel -type pliers to loosen the slip nuts.  Continue to 4 of 8 below.
kitchen sink trap 2

Kitchen Sink Trap

Step 4: Clear the Trap Clear the clogged trap. Aaron Stickley The trap is the most likely location of the clog so examine it carefully for debris. You can use a toothbrush or other small utility brush to clean it, or you can flush it with water at another sink. If there was a noticeable clog here, you will need to go no further and can reassemble the drain trap now. If there is no sign of clog in the trap, you will need to pursue your investigation further into the next pieces of the drain assembly.  Continue to 6 of 8 below.
kitchen sink trap 3

Kitchen Sink Trap

Remove the Old Sink Before you begin, snap a picture of your plumbing configuration. This serves as a handy reference if you’re having trouble reassembling the plumbing later. Step 1 Turn off both the hot and cold water supply lines. The shutoff valves typically are in the cabinet below the sink or in the basement. If you cannot find them, turn off the main water line to the house. Step 2 Turn on the faucet to relieve water pressure in the lines. Step 3 Use adjustable wrenches to disconnect the water supply lines to the faucet. Have a small bucket ready to catch any water left in the supply lines and drainpipes as they are removed. Good to KnowLeave the faucet attached to the sink. You can remove both the sink and the faucet as one unit. Step 4 If you have a garbage disposer, turn off the circuit, then unplug it. Use pliers to disconnect the drainpipe and P-trap from the sink drain. Keep a bucket or pan underneath the drain to catch excess water. Step 5 Then remove the dishwasher drain line. Step 6 Remove the disposer following the manufacturer’s instructions. If you don’t have your disposer instructions, check the manufacturer’s website. Have a bucket ready to catch any water. Most disposers loosen at the mounting bracket connection to the sink drain and twist off. Step 7 Locate the metal clips under the counter around the sink’s perimeter. Loosen them with a screwdriver, open-end wrench or socket wrench and swing them toward the sink bowl. Step 8 Cut the caulk around the sink with a utility knife. Step 9 Push the unit from underneath and lift the old sink away. Step 10 Use a putty knife to remove grime, caulk and old plumber’s putty from the countertop. Likewise, clean any components you will re-install.
kitchen sink trap 4

Kitchen Sink Trap

Prepare for the New Kitchen Sink Before you begin this project, read the manufacturer’s instructions and follow all local building codes. If you’re not comfortable installing a kitchen sink or related components (faucets and garbage disposers), Lowe’s can do it for you. Select the appropriate type of replacement sink. Single- and double-bowl drop-in sinks can be installed into most countertop surfaces. Undermount sinks install beneath the counter and should only be used with solid-surface and natural or engineered stone countertops. These instructions are for installing a drop-in sink. Step 1 Measure your existing sink. If your new sink has different dimensions and drain location(s) than the unit it will replace, you may need to modify the countertop opening and / or plumbing. Good to KnowFor best results, make a drawing of your old sink with all measurements including distances from the sink wall to the drain center to use as a shopping aid and reference. Or you can remove your old sink, take it to Lowe’s, and ask a Lowe’s associate to help you select a replacement unit. CautionWear safety glasses when working under the sink or cutting pipe and other materials. Step 2 Decide if you will also replace the faucet or install additional components such as a sprayer, soap dispenser, on-demand hot water tap or filtered water tap.Standard sinks have 1, 2, 3 or 4 holes on the rear lip for a faucet and additional components.Installation of a new faucet and other components is easier if it is done when you are installing a new sink, since you can easily access the hardware with the sink out of the countertop.

Kitchen Sink Trap

Kitchen Sink Trap
Kitchen Sink Trap